VMware Cloud Marketplace, Bitnami and VMware Cloud on AWS

Nico Vibert cross-post series part 4 | Discover the benefits of VMware Cloud Marketplace and how easy it is to deploy third-party software with VMware Cloud on AWS. Also, learn how the Bitnami acquisition led to the validation and availability of a wide range of new applications on our marketplace.

Original was posted here.

This post will walk through the VMware Cloud Marketplace, Bitnami and VMware Cloud on AWS.

One of the most underrated aspects of the success of AWS EC2 is the ease at which customers can deploy 3rd party software onto their platform via the AWS Marketplace. Based on the latest data I’ve come across, the AWS Marketplace had over 200,000 customers, over 1,400 ISVs and over 650 millions hours of EC2 deployed monthly.

I have actually used it on previous occasions for blog posts, for my Transit VPC tests, to deploy a Splunk instance or to use FlowMon (an IPFIX collector), for the IPFIX section in the VMware Cloud on AWS Networking book.

Unsurprisingly, we (VMware) also recently launched our own marketplace (appropriately called VMware Cloud Marketplace), which will work with VMware Cloud on AWS but also vCloud Director (vCD)-based deployments.

And one of the ideas behind the recent acquisition of Bitnami was to add a ton of validated and packaged applications to our VMware Cloud Marketplace.

Ultimately, as VMware transitions to an As-A-Service model, it should help our customers consume their vSphere infrastructure faster and make it easier for our partners to offer their software.

Let’s have a look at how it works.

First, the VMware Cloud Marketplace is one of the VMware Cloud Services. Go to cloud.vmware.com and log on to the console.

VMware Cloud Services
VMware Cloud Services

Select VMware Cloud Marketplace and you’ll see a list of applications that you can easily consume:

VMware Cloud Marketplace
VMware Cloud Marketplace

What about if we deploy the online learning open-source software Moodle:

Search function
Search function

Once you select the Moodle Virtual Appliance, you can see the couple of options on the top-right corner. “Download” downloads the OVA while “Subscribe” lets you add it to your VMware Cloud on AWS SDDC Content Library.

Moodle Virtual Appliance
Moodle Virtual Appliance

Once you select “Subscribe”, you are asked to select which version you want to install and for which platform (VCD, VCD on-prem or VMC):

Subscribe - Step 1
Subscribe – Step 1

Select the SDDC where you’re going to deploy the Content Library and enter your vCenter credentials:

Subscribe - Step 2
Subscribe – Step 2

Select the WorkloadDatastore:

Subscribe - Step 3
Subscribe – Step 3

Confirm you’re happy with the configuration:

Subscribe - Step 4
Subscribe – Step 4

Accept the EULA and finish the subscription.

Subscribe - Step 1
Subscribe – Step 5

Within seconds, you will see the “VMware Cloud Marketplace” Content Library in your SDDC and you can go ahead and deploy the app.

Content Library populated with OVA
Content Library populated with OVA

Deploy a VM from the template as you would do for any OVA template:

Deploy Moodle template
Deploy Moodle template

Follow the standard deployment steps and boot up the VM. If you’ve never used Bitnami, you need to be aware that the default VM credentials are not always obvious to find. It’s explained in this link. Once you boot up the VM, you can see the default credentials for your app:

Bitnami App credentials
Bitnami App credentials

As you log on, you’re forced to reset your password. Let’s finish off by showing off very quickly how I can make my Moodle accessible over the Internet.

I’ve covered it before in a couple of posts (this oneand this one) but it’s always worth a reminder.

As you can see in the picture above, the private IP address of the Moodle is 172.30.117.17. Let’s request a public IP (remember – it’s chargeable).

Go to the VMC Networking and Security Console and System / Public IPs:

Request Public IP
Request Public IP

In a couple of seconds, you’ll get a public IP.

VMC Public IP
VMC Public IP

Go to Network / NAT and create the appropriate NAT rule (for me, it’s simply to match HTTP traffic from 3.124.62.184 to 172.30.117.17).

NAT Rule
NAT Rule

Finally, set up a firewall rule on the Compute Gateway to allow HTTP traffic to the selected VM and you’re good to go.

Firewall Rule CGW
Firewall Rule CGW

And we’re connected to our Moodle over the Internet.

Moodle Portal
Moodle Portal

Last thing – all my applications subscriptions can be found back on the VMware Cloud Marketplace. Most of the stuff on the marketplace is free but there are also 3rd party applications (Checkpoint, Druva, TrendMicro, Puppet) where you need to bring your own license.

VMware Cloud Marketplace Subscription
VMware Cloud Marketplace Subscription

As you can see – the whole application deployment process has been made pretty painless by leveraging the VMware Cloud Marketplace, its packaged open-source applications from Bitnami and the intuitive VMware Cloud on AWS networking configuration.

Thanks for reading.

About the Authors

Nicolas Vibert

Lead Solution Engineer - VMware Cloud at VMware

I am Nico Vibert and currently work for VMware as a Lead Solution Engineer for the VMware Cloud on AWS service. Most of my career has been spent in the networking world, from a junior support engineer working for a Cisco partner to a senior network architect working for Cisco itself. I finally joined VMware late in 2015 and worked on the network virtualization software NSX until I transitioned to the VMware Cloud on AWS team. If you’re really that curious, you can find out more on my LinkedIn profile. I have a strong technical background which I have validated with 17 certifications over my career, across multiple vendors (Cisco, VMware, AWS, etc.). I hold the Cisco CCIE certification, recognised as one of the toughest certifications in the IT Industry (I recently published some thoughts on my 10-year anniversary as a CCIE). To complement my technical certifications and expertise, I built solid enterprise architecture skills (based on TOGAF) and have written business cases and devised complex financial ROI models. I am a polished presenter and can articulate complex solutions from CxO-level to entry-level engineer. I regularly speak at events, whether on a large scale such as VMworld, Cisco Live or at smaller forums such as VMUGs or local events. Finally, I’m passionate about knowledge sharing and mentoring: I regularly train new hires and take the time to mentor individuals across VMware.

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